Weekly T4D/Innovation Insights & Updates #4

Wishing everyone a Happy Friday. For this week’s installment of ESARO’s T4D/Innovation Insights and Updates, we’ll take a look at some of the worst practices of using ICT in programme sections.

http://blogs.worldbank.org/edutech/worst-practice

While this blog post specifically focuses on using ICT in education, the lessons can be applied across all UNICEF programme sections.

  A quick look at the worst practices:

1.     Dump hardware in schools, hope for magic to happen

2.     Design for OECD learning environments, implement elsewhere

3.     Think about education content only after you have rolled out your hardware

4.     Assume you can import content from somewhere else

5.     Don’t monitor, don’t evaluate

6.     Make a big bet on an unproven technology (especially one based on a closed/proprietary standard) or single vendor

7.     Don’t think about (or acknowledge) total cost of ownership/operation issues or calculations

8.     Assume away equity issues

9.     Don’t train your teachers (nor school headmasters, for that matter)

10.   _________(No. 10 is purposefully left blank to reinforce that many other worst practices exist.)

However, knowing the “what not to dos” is only part of the learning process as we become more familiar with integrating T4D in programme delivery. Last month Global Innovations launched the Child Friendly Technology Framework to help programme sections think through some of the challenges that arise when designing a new project with a tech component. With the help of 52 worksheets to stimulate thinking and discussion, the framework helps guide a new project from the idea stage through producing a Concept Note and Executive Summary to guide project implementation..

http://unicefstories.org/2013/08/06/child-friendly-technology-framework/ 

 Hopefully, by utilizing some of the planning tools such as the Child Friendly Technology Framework, we can avoid committing some of the “worst practices” mentioned.

 

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